Friday, 31 January 2020

Saturday, February 1, 2020 - YouTube Reflections

No matter how rough or threatening the sea might be or how high the waves might be, if Jesus is in the boat of our lives, we will always reach the shore safely.

Saturday, february 1, 2020 - Have you stopped rowing the boat of life because you are overwhelmed with the storms? Will you start rowing again today?


To read the texts click on the texts: 2 Sam 12: 1-7,10-17; Mk 4:35-41
The Gospel reading of today appears immediately after Jesus has completed the Parable Discourse. It is commonly referred to as the miracle of the calming of the storm. While this miracle appears also in the Gospels in Matthew and Luke, the language of the disciples in Mark is harsh. In Matthew, the disciples address Jesus as Lord, and their cry is a plea for help, much like our “Lord have mercy” at the penitential rite. In Luke, like in Mark, Jesus is addressed as “Master” but no allegation about his uncaring attitude is made. In Mark, the disciples allege that Jesus is unconcerned about them. Mark also brings out the contrast between the agitated disciples and the serene Jesus. Jesus is able with a word to calm the forces of nature, and suddenly, there is a great calm.

The boat has often been seen as a symbol of Christianity. The storm then would be the trials and tribulations that attack Christianity from without. Jesus is present with his people even in the midst of all these trials, even though sometimes it may appear that he is asleep and unconcerned. He is able with a word to calm these forces, and so there is no need for agitation and anxious care. We need to keep rowing and trust that he will see us safely to the shore.

Saturday, February 1, 2020 - 2 Sam 12: 1-7,10-17; Mk 4:35-41

Saturday, February 1, 2020 - 2 Sam 12: 1-7,10-17; Mk 4:35-41


  1. What does Nathan say the rich man had?

  2. Few flocks and herds
    Very many flocks and herds
    Not many flocks and herds

  3. What arose when Jesus was in the boat?

  4. A snowstrom
    A windstorm
    A rainstorm

  5. From whose hand had God rescued David?

  6. The Philistine's hand
    Saul's hand
    Nathan's hand

  7. What does Nathan say the poor man had?

  8. One ewe lamb
    One goat
    One small cow

  9. What was Jesus doing when the storm arose?

  10. He was praying
    He was eating
    He was sleeping

  11. Who came to the rich man?

  12. His brother
    A traveller
    His sister

  13. Whom did Jesus rebuke?

  14. Peter
    The wind
    The disciples

  15. How much did David say the rich man must restore?

  16. Sevenfold
    Fourfold
    Fivefold

  17. What were the disciples filled with after Jesus stilled the storm?

  18. Grace
    Love
    Awe

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. We must keep rowing no matter how high the waves
    Jesus' presence can calm all the storms in our lives
    We must have confidence in the Lord

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Thursday, 30 January 2020

Friday, January 31, 2020 - YouTube Reflections

It is sometimes the case that we spend much of our time worrying about the outcome of our actions even before we can do them. This attitude does not allow us to be in the present moment and so the action that we do is not done to the best of our ability. We do not put ourselves fully into the action that we do. At other times, we do not act at all but only worry. If we act rather than worry, our actions will bear fruit

Friday, January 31, 2020 - Do you more often than not focus on the present or the future? Do you focus on the now or on the later?


To read the texts click on the texts: 2 Sam 11:1-4,5,10,13-17; Mk 4:26-34
The text of today contains two parables. The first of these (4:26-29) is known as the Parable of the seed growing secretly, and is found only in the Gospel of Mark. The second (4:30-32), known as the Parable of the Mustard seed is also found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke.

In the first parable the point that is being made is that the one who scatters the seed only does so and then goes about his routine, not worried about the outcome of his effort. The seed continues to grow, simply because he has first scattered it. He knows that by worrying the seed will not grow faster, and so he lets it be.
In the Parable of the Mustard seed, the point that is made is that from little, there will be much. Small beginnings have great endings. The parable is a call to begin what one has to do without worrying about how small or big the outcome will be. The growth is sure and definite.

When Mark says in 4:33 that Jesus did not speak to the people without a parable, he is in effect saying that there was a parabolic character about all of Jesus’ teaching. This means that all of Jesus’ teaching involved the listener and it was the listener who supplied the lesson to the teaching and not Jesus. This indicates a freedom of choice that every listener was given at the time of Jesus. They were the ones to decide for or against. Jesus would never force them to accept his point of view.

It is sometimes the case that we spend much of our time worrying about the outcome of our actions even before we can do them. This attitude does not allow us to be in the present moment and so the action that we do is not done to the best of our ability. We do not put ourselves fully into the action that we do. At other times, we do not act at all but only worry. While the first of today’s parable is calling us to act and then relax rather than worry, the second is assuring us that our actions will indeed bear fruit.

Friday, January 31, 2020 - 2 Samuel 11:1-4,5-10,13-17; Mk 4:26-34

Friday, January 31, 2020 - 2 Samuel 11:1-4,5-10,13-17; Mk 4:26-34


  1. What seed does Jesus mention in the Gospel text of today?

  2. Acorn
    Mustard
    Corn

  3. Where does Jesus say the person scatters?

  4. In the field
    In the vineyard
    On the ground

  5. Who was Bathsheba's husband?

  6. Uriah
    Joab
    Eliam

  7. Where did Uriah sleep when he was sent home?

  8. In his bed
    At the entrance of the king's house
    On a mat in his home

  9. Who was Bathsheba's father?

  10. Eliam
    Uriah
    Joab

  11. What did Jesus do in private with his disciples?

  12. He told them secrets
    He explained everything
    He spoke loudly

  13. How did Jesus speak to the people?

  14. Plainly
    In Parables
    In metaphors

  15. Whom did David send with his officers to fight the Ammonites?

  16. Uriah
    Joab
    Jacob

  17. Where do the birds of the air make their nests?

  18. In the shade of the mustard shrub
    In the branches of the mustard tree
    In the trunk of the mustard shrub

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. We do what we have to do and leave the rest to God
    We must focus on the present and not the future
    The present determines the future

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Wednesday, 29 January 2020

Thursday, January 30, 2020 - YouTube Reflections

Sometimes our closed attitudes and minds and our reluctance to accept change and newness may result in our missing out on all the revelations of the glory of God taking place around us. If we only open the eyes of our heart to see and the ears of our hearts to hear, we will be able to find God in all things and all things in him.

Thursday, January 30, 2020 - How would you define the WORD OF GOD? Have you assimilated this WORD?


To read the texts click on the texts: 2 Sam 7:18-19, 24-29; Mk 4:21-25
The text of today follows immediately after the interpretation of the Parable of the Sower and the seed and contains two similes: that of the lamp and the measure. 
In Mark they seem to be connected with the response that a person makes to the Word spoken by Jesus. This Word is not an esoteric or secret Word. It is a Word that is to be make known, to be revealed, like a lamp is to be on a lamp stand. If one is open and receptive to this Word (the Measure of one’s openness) one will receive from God not only the ability to understand it but also to assimilate it.

Sometimes our closed attitudes and minds and our reluctance to accept change and newness may result in our missing out on all the revelations of the glory of God taking place around us. If we only open the eyes of our heart to see and the ears of our hearts to hear, we will be able to find God in all things and all things in him.

Thursday, January 30, 2020 - 2 Sam 7:18-19, 24-29; Mk 4:21-25

Thursday, January 30, 2020 - 2 Sam 7:18-19, 24-29; Mk 4:21-25


  1. Where does Jesus say a lamp is put?

  2. Under a bushel basket
    Under the bed
    On a lampstand

  3. What does Jesus will happen top those who have?

  4. What they have will be taken away
    They will be given more
    They will be given less

  5. How many chapters does the Gospel of Mark contain?

  6. Fifteen
    Sixteen
    Seventeen

  7. Which place does David say the Lord of hosts is God over?

  8. Judah
    Israel
    Jerusalem

  9. What will happen to that which is secret?

  10. It will not be revealed
    It will come to light
    It will remain secret

  11. What will be the measure that one gets

  12. The measure one gives
    The measure one holds back
    The measure that one does not give

  13. What will happen to those who have nothing?

  14. They will be given something
    Even what they have will be taken away
    They will be given everything

  15. Where does Jesus say a lamp is not put?

  16. On a lamp stand
    On a height
    Under a bushel basket

  17. What will happen to that which is hidden?

  18. It will be disclosed
    It will remain hidden
    It will not be seen

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. We must be open to receive God's word
    God speaks in different ways
    God comes in the most unexpected of ways

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Tuesday, 28 January 2020

Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - YouTube Reflections

We may tend to lose heart when we see that most of our efforts do not seem to be bearing fruit. At times like these the Parable of the Sower offers hope that even though much of our effort may seem to be lost, the gain that will arise from it will be enormous. It invites us not to ever lose heart but to keep on doing our part and leave the rest to God. It is calling us to sow and rest confident in the hope that God will make it grow.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - How often have you given into despair and lost hope? Will you continue to hope today?


To read the texts click on the texts: 2 Sam 7:4-17; Mk 4:1-20
The text of today is taken from what is known as The Parable Discourse in the Gospel of Mark. The text contains an introduction to the Discourse (4:1-2), the parable of the Sower (4:3-9), a saying on the kingdom and its secret (4:10-12) and the interpretation of the parable (4:13-20). It is important that while it is likely that Jesus uttered the parable, in all probability the interpretation is the work of the early church. This is why; the interpretation of these texts must be done separately.

The parable of the Sower seems to point out that of the four types of soil in which the seed falls, it is LOST in three types and bears fruit in only one type. This indicates that while three quarters of the effort are lost, only a quarter is gain. However, the focus of the parable is not on the loss but on the gain, which even that one-quarter brings. The Parable is pointing out to the fact that this is how life often is. Three quarters of our efforts seem to be wasted and it is possible that when this happens we may give in to despair. However, we are called to focus not on this but on the enormous gain that the one-quarter of our effort will indeed bring.

We may tend to lose heart when we see that most of our efforts do not seem to be bearing fruit. At times like these the Parable of the Sower offers hope that even though much of our effort may seem to be lost, the gain that will arise from it will be enormous. It invites us not to ever lose heart but to keep on doing our part and leave the rest to God. It is calling us to sow and rest confident in the hope that God will make it grow.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 2 Sam 7:4-17; Mk 4:1-20

Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 2 Sam 7:4-17; Mk 4:1-20


  1. From whom did the Lord say he took away his steadfast love?

  2. David
    Solomon
    Saul

  3. What happens to the seed in rocky ground?

  4. The birds eat it up
    It was scorched
    It was choked

  5. Which prophet does Jesus quote?

  6. Jeremiah
    Isaiah
    Ezekiel

  7. Which seed brought forth grain?

  8. The seed sown along the path
    The seed sown in good soil
    The seed sown among thorns

  9. How many types of soil does Jesus mention?

  10. One
    Two
    Four

  11. Who was the prophet sent to David?

  12. Samuel
    Elijah
    Nathan

  13. What happened to the seed sown on the path?

  14. It was scorched
    The birds ate it up
    It was chocked

  15. Where did Jesus go before he began to teach?

  16. On the shore
    In a boat
    On dry land

  17. Where did God say he was moving about?

  18. in the wilderness
    In a tent and tabernacle
    In the forest

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. We must sow the Lord will make it grow
    We do our best the Lord will do the rest
    We must focus on the action not the result

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Monday, 27 January 2020

Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - YouTube Reflections

We may imagine that because we have been baptised are bear the name Christian we are automatically counted as members of Jesus’ family. However, baptism alone will not make us members of Jesus’ family, but the living out of the baptismal promises in our lives. This means that we must each do what we are called to do, namely our best at every given moment.

Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - If Jesus were to point to his family today, would you be counted as a member?


To read the texts click on the texts: 2 Sam 6:12-15,17-19; Mk 3:31-35
The text of today forms the second part of the “sandwich” construction that Mark has used here. He introduced the family of Jesus in 3:20-21, interrupted this with the text on the Beelzebul controversy (3:22-30) and returns to the family of Jesus is today’s text 3:31-35. By using such a structure, Mark indicates that the family of Jesus are also hostile to Jesus. Also, Mark places them “outside” while Jesus is “inside” the house. This too indicates that they are not disciples. Jesus then defines family in terms of those who do the will of God. Some also think that by not mentioning the father of Jesus, Mark wants to assert that for Jesus and his disciples, only God is Father.

We may imagine that because we have been baptised are bear the name Christian we are automatically counted as members of Jesus’ family. However, baptism alone will not make us members of Jesus’ family, but the living out of the baptismal promises in our lives. This means that we must each do what we are called to do, namely our best at every given moment. 

Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - 2 Sam 6:12-15,17-19; Mk 3:31-35

Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - 2 Sam 6:12-15,17-19; Mk 3:31-35


  1. Where was the ark placed?

  2. In the open
    On a height
    In the tent

  3. Where did the mother and brothers of Jesus stand?

  4. Outside
    Inside
    In the middle

  5. Besides burnt offerings what else did David offer?

  6. Redemption offerings
    Offerings of well-being
    Sin offerings

  7. What did David do before the Lord with all his might?

  8. Bowed low
    Danced
    Paid obeisance

  9. Besides an ox what else did David sacrifice?

  10. Nothing
    A fatling
    A ram

  11. Who was sitting around Jesus when his mother and brothers called to him?

  12. His disciples
    A crowd
    The sick and paralysed

  13. How many paces did those who bore the ark go before David sacrificed?

  14. Seven
    Six
    Eight

  15. What did David give to each besides bread and meat?

  16. Raisins
    Fish
    Flowers

  17. Who does Jesus say is his mother, brother and sister?

  18. The one who is related to him
    The one who does the will of God
    The one who does not sin

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. To be related to Jesus means to do God's will
    We are not related to Jesus merely because we are baptised
    We need to show in action that we are related to Jesus

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Sunday, 26 January 2020

Monday, January 27, 2020 - YouTube Reflections


Today the sin against the Holy Spirit is to refuse to believe that the Spirit can transform me. Practically this means to give up even before one can begin. It means to give in or throw in the towel. It means not to give the Spirit a chance to work in our lives. It means a refusal to persevere and keep on keeping on.

Monday, January 27, 2020 - Is your general attitude to life positive or negative? Will you make an attempt to interpret every incident positively today?

To read the texts click on the texts: 2 Sam 5:1-7,10; Mk 3:22-30
The text of today is known as the Beelzebul controversy. Scribes who come from Jerusalem accuse Jesus of casting out demons by the prince of demons. Jesus refutes their claim by showing how absurd it would be for Satan to cast himself out. The strong man whom Jesus talks about is Satan and the one who binds up the strong man is Jesus himself. Rather than accuse Jesus, the scribes must be able to see that with the coming of Jesus the reign of Satan is at an end.

The sin, which cannot be forgiven, is the sin against the Holy Spirit. Since there is the danger of looking at this sin as a specific sin, Mark clarifies that the reason why Jesus says this is because they accused him of having an unclean spirit. This means that the sin spoken of here is an attitude rather than a specific sin. It refers to the attitude of being closed to the revelation that God is making of himself in Jesus. It is an attitude of closing one’s eyes and refusing to see.

Today the sin against the Holy Spirit is to refuse to believe that the Spirit can transform me. Practically this means to give up even before one can begin. It means to give in or throw in the towel. It means not to give the Spirit a chance to work in our lives. It means a refusal to persevere and keep on keeping on.

Monday, January 27, 2020 - 2 Sam 5:1-7,10; Mk 3:22-30

Monday, January 27, 2020 - 2 Sam 5:1-7,10; Mk 3:22-30


  1. For how many years did David reign?

  2. Forty
    Thirty
    Fifty

  3. Against whom did David and his men march?

  4. The Amalakites
    The Jebusites
    The Peruzittes

  5. What is now known at the city of David?

  6. Zion
    Capernaum
    Jerusalem

  7. How can one plunder the strong man's house?

  8. By entering at night
    By tying up the strong man
    By entering when he is not there

  9. How many years did David reign at Jerusalem?

  10. Thirty-three years
    Thirty years
    Thirty-two years

  11. How old was David when he began to reign?

  12. Thirty years old
    Forty years old
    Twenty years old

  13. From where did the scribes who accused Jesus come?

  14. Galilee
    Samaria
    Jerusalem

  15. Where did the tribes come to David?

  16. Sinai
    Hebron
    Horeb

  17. Who does Jesus say will not cast out Satan?

  18. God
    Satan
    Jesus

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. Our attitude is as or even more important than our action
    Our attitude must be positive
    A pure intention means an efficacious action

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Saturday, 25 January 2020

Sunday, January 26, 2020 - Isa 8:23-9:3; 1 Cor 1:10-13,17; Mt 4:12-23

Sunday, January 26, 2020 - Isa 8:23-9:3; 1 Cor 1:10-13,17; Mt 4:12-23


  1. Who did Jesus first see as he passed the sea of Galilee?

  2. James and John
    Simon and Andrew
    Judas Iscariot

  3. What does Paul say Christ sent him to do?

  4. Preach the Gospel
    Baptise
    To be good

  5. Who were the third and fourth disciples to be called?

  6. Simon and John
    Peter and James
    James and John

  7. When did Jesus withdraw to Galilee?

  8. When his time had come
    When he heard that John had been arrested
    When his disciples called him

  9. Where did Jesus go teaching in the synagogues?

  10. Galilee
    Jerusalem
    Samaria

  11. Who reported to Paul that there were divisions among the Corinthians?

  12. Apollos' people
    Chloe's people
    Cephas' people

  13. Where did Jesus make his home?

  14. Nazareth
    Capernaum
    Bethlehem

  15. What have the people who walked in darkness seen?

  16. Hope
    A great light
    Truth

  17. Which Old Testament prophet is quoted by Matthew?

  18. Isaiah
    Jeremiah
    Amos

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. Jesus calls all who will listen
    Jesus brings the kingdom
    The kingdom is freedom

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant

Sunday, January 26, 2020 - YouTube Reflections


Like Jesus, the task of the Christian who decides to follow him will be that of making people whole. Through this action every Christian is called to proclaim the Good News that God’s love, mercy, pardon and forgiveness are indeed a reality today. The Kingdom has come.

Sunday, January 26, 2020 - The Kingdom has come in Jesus


To read the texts click on the texts: Isa 8:23-9:3; 1 Cor 1:10-13,17; Mt 4:12-23
Zebulun and Naphtali were the first provinces of the Northern kingdom that were captured when the Assyrians took Israel into exile. This is the humiliation that Isaiah speaks about in the first reading of today. However, that is now past. There will now be a reversal brought about by God through his Messianic king, and these will be the first to experience it.

Darkness has turned into light and for Matthew this prophecy of Isaiah is seen as being fulfilled in the ministry of Jesus in Galilee. This ministry in Matthew begins after the arrest of John the Baptist. The choice of location for the beginning of the ministry is Capernaum and in the territory of Zebulun and Naphtali mentioned in the first reading and serves as a setting for the fifth formula quotation in the Gospel. The movement from darkness to light that Isaiah prophesied comes about in Matthew through a response to Jesus’ call to repentance. It is important to understand the placement of the words by Matthew. Though Matthew places the imperative (Repent) before the indicative (for the kingdom of heaven has come near), it must be understood that the basis or reason for repentance is that the kingdom has come near. Something has happened or taken place and therefore something needs to be done. The text does not say that the kingdom will come after repentance rather because the kingdom has indeed come and in the person and ministry of Jesus, people should repent.

The word “repentance” has sometimes been translated to mean “be sorry”, but nowhere in the Gospels does Jesus ask anyone to be sorry for their sins. Yet, he constantly calls people to repentance. The English word “repent” is a translation of the Greek metanoeĆ“  which literally means “change one’s mind” – quite like the man who came home one day and told his wife, “Honey, I’ve changed my mind.” “Thank God,” said his wife, “I hope the new one will function better.” Repentance therefore is taking out that small mind which engages in stereotyping and dwelling on negatives and replacing it with a mind that is open and flexible and filled with the positive of God’s unconditional love. This openness is the result of having realized that the kingdom has indeed come near. The coming of the kingdom means that God’s unconditional love, mercy, forgiveness, pardon and acceptance have all been given to us freely in Jesus. This means we can do nothing to earn this love; all we have to do is receive it with gratitude and in humility.

How is this repentance shown in action? Paul gives the answer to this question in the second reading of today when he calls the Corinthians and us to be united. Differences must be made up and disagreements must be ironed out. Each Christian individually and all Christians collectively belong only to Christ and to no one else. To heal the wounds of the divided body of Christ, right words and slogans are certainly necessary but they are by no means sufficient. Primarily we need the right attitudes which spring from a recognition that we all belong to Christ.

While unity does not mean uniformity, the legitimate expression of diversity should never lead to division, since Christ is not divided but one. This is the Christ whom Paul preached and wants each of us to continue to preach. His preaching was not in philosophical terms or treatises but in language that conveyed that all that was received was through grace.

It was this grace and free choice of God that led Jesus to call the first four disciples. Jesus takes the initiative here. He comes to the brothers Simon and Andrew, he sees them and he calls them. He does the same with James and John. They respond generously to his call which is both a command and promise. The command is to follow the person of Jesus and not merely a value or an ideal. This indicates that following Jesus demands first of all total dedication to him.

The summary statement which concludes the Gospel reading serves as a summary of all three readings. Like Jesus, the task of the Christian who decides to follow him will be that of making people whole. Through this action every Christian is called to proclaim the Good News that God’s love, mercy, pardon and forgiveness are indeed a reality today. The Kingdom has come.

Friday, 24 January 2020

Saturday, January 25, 2020 - YouTube Reflections


The Gospel that Paul proclaimed may be summarised in these words “God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself”

Saturday, January 25, 2020 - The Conversion of St. Paul - Saul changed his name to Paul after his conversion. What will you do as a result of having met Jesus Christ?


To read the texts click on the texts: Acts 22:3-16; Mk 16:15-18
Paul’s entire life can be explained in terms of one experience—his meeting with Jesus on the road to Damascus. In that instant he saw what he could become through grace and not law. It was a revelation to him that no matter how low a person may have fallen; God’s grace could always lift him/her up. It was also a revelation of the heights of mysticism one could reach if one opened oneself to God’s unlimited and unconditional grace.

The story of Paul’s conversion is narrated twice in the Acts of the Apostles (Chapters 9 and 22) and Paul himself makes reference to it in some of his letters (Gal 1:13-14; 1 Cor 9:1-2; 15:3-8).

The conversion of Saul to Paul was the conversion and transformation of a person who lived out the letter of the law, but forgot its spirit. However, once he allowed God’s grace to enter his heart, all that mattered to him was Christ and through Christ divine, gratuitous love. From the moment of his transformation, the focus of his preaching was that salvation was FOR ALL and that no amount of merit could save, because salvation was a free gift of God.

The first reading for the Feast speaks of his conversion and the Gospel text is from the longer ending of Mark and is an apt description of Paul’s power and actions after his transformation. He did indeed proclaim the Gospel to all creation and today invites us to do the same.

His Gospel may be summarised in one sentence, “God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself” (2 Cor 5:19)


Saturday, January 25, 2020 - Acts 22:3-16; Mk 16:15-18

Saturday, January 25, 2020 - Acts 22:3-16; Mk 16:15-18


  1. At whose feet does Paul say he was brought up?

  2. Jesus' feet
    Gamaliel's feet
    Hilel's feet

  3. At what time did the light from heaven fall on Saul?

  4. At sundown
    At noon
    At night

  5. Where does tell his disciples to go?

  6. Galilee
    Jerusalem
    The whole world

  7. Who gave back Paul his sight after he was blinded by the light from heaven?

  8. Zechariah
    Anani′as
    Zebedee

  9. What will the believers in Jesus lay on the sick?

  10. Healing oil
    Their hands
    Their prayers

  11. Where does Paul say he was born?

  12. Galilee
    Bethlehem
    Tarsus

  13. Who does Paul say he persecuted to death?

  14. The Way
    The Truth
    The Life

  15. To which place was Paul planning to take Christians to be punished?

  16. Bethlehem
    Jerusalem
    Damascus

  17. Where was Paul journeying after he received the letters?

  18. Tarsus
    Damascus
    Bethlehem

  19. What is the message of the Gospel of today?

  20. Paul remained open to the Spirit and so was transformed
    Saul became Paul through God's grace
    Saul was graced by God because of his openness

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Thursday, 23 January 2020

Friday, January 24, 2020 - YouTube Reflections


Each of us also received a new name at our Baptism: the name “Christian”. The challenge is to hear Jesus call our name and to have the courage to answer that call.

Friday, January 24, 2020 - If Jesus were to choose a nickname for you, what would that be? Why?


To read the texts click on the texts: 1 Sam 24:3-21; Mk 3:13-19
Mark narrates here the choice of the twelve disciples. The number twelve makes this group representative of the twelve tribes of Israel and thus Jesus would be seen as the one who has come to restore Israel.

Mark makes three points in his narration of the choice of the twelve. The first is that the primary reason for the choice of the Twelve is “to be with him”. This means that their primary responsibility is to accompany Jesus on his journey to the Father. The second point is that besides “being with him”, they are also sent out to preach and heal, to say and to do, word and action. The Kingdom of God is not merely a spiritual enterprise, but connected intimately with the whole of life. It is a practical enterprise as well. The third point that Mark makes is that some of the Twelve are given nicknames. Simon is named “Peter” (which means “rock”) and James and John are named “Boanerges” (which means “sons of thunder”). These signified their function. Judas Iscariot is not renamed, but Mark gives us an indication already here of what he will do in the future.

Each of us also received a new name at our Baptism: the name “Christian”. The challenge is to hear Jesus call our name and to have the courage to answer that call.

Friday, January 24, 2020 - 1 Sam 24:3-21; Mk 3:13-19

Friday, January 24, 2020 - 1 Sam 24:3-21; Mk 3:13-19


  1. Who is the last disciple to be named?

  2. Simon Peter
    Judas
    James

  3. Besides James the brother of John, who is the other James?

  4. James the son of Zebedee
    James the son of Alphaeus
    James the brother of the Lord

  5. Where were David and his men sitting?

  6. Outside the cave
    In the innermost part of the cave
    On top of a rock

  7. Besides Simon Peter who is the other Simon?

  8. Simon the son of James
    Simon the Cananaean
    Simon the brother of Andrew

  9. Who is the first disciple to be named?

  10. Simon Peter
    James
    John

  11. Which disciple is paired with Philip?

  12. James
    Andrew
    John

  13. What did David cut off of Saul?

  14. Locks of his hair
    The skirt of Saul’s robe
    The armour of Saul

  15. How many did Jesus appoint to be with him?

  16. Twelve
    Eleven
    Ten

  17. What did Saul do when David finished speaking?

  18. He attacked him with a sword
    He lifted up his voice and wept
    He rose up against him

  19. What is the message of the Gospel of today?

  20. Jesus is one name and all names
    Jesus is beyond all names
    Jesus chooses us today and we must respond

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Wednesday, 22 January 2020

Thursday, January 23, 2020 - YouTube Reflections


It is possible that we relate to God or Jesus as we would relate to the local grocer and go to him only when we need something. The text of today challenges us to review our relationship with Jesus and ask ourselves what he really means to us.

Thursday, January 23, 2020 - If you were to choose one word to describe your relationship with Jesus what word would you choose?

To read the texts click on the texts:1 Sam 18:6-9; 19:1-7; Mk 3:7-12
Mark gives in these verses a summary account of the themes that have appeared from the beginning of the Gospel. Jesus' popularity increases and he cannot appear in public without being pressured by great multitudes seeking to he healed. Jesus' reputation has spread even to those towns where he did not go personally. The use of the term multitude here and the mention of the names of places as far as the region around Tyre and Sidon are an indication that Jesus’ authority is much greater than that of John the Baptist to whom in Mark people came from only the Judean countryside and Jerusalem (1:5). These multitudes are not necessarily disciples, and could have come to see Jesus out of curiosity or even to receive healing.

Mark once again has the command to silence, which is where Jesus commands the demons not to make him known. While some interpret this command as belonging to the rite of exorcism, others see it as Mark's desire to reject the testimony of the demons as evidence for Jesus' identity.

It is possible that we relate to God or Jesus as we would relate to the local grocer and go to him only when we need something. The text of today challenges us to review our relationship with Jesus and ask ourselves what he really means to us.

Thursday, January 23, 2020 - 1 Sam 18:6-9; 19:1-7; Mk 3:7-12

Thursday, January 23, 2020 - 1 Sam 18:6-9; 19:1-7; Mk 3:7-12


  1. How many did the women sing that David had slain?

  2. Thousands
    Ten thousands
    One thousand

  3. With whom did Jesus to the sea?

  4. His family
    His disciples
    The crowds

  5. What did Jesus do when the unclean spirits cried out?

  6. He ordered them not to make him known
    He set them free
    He banished them forever

  7. Besides his servants who else did Saul tell to kill David?

  8. The chief of his army
    His brother Jonathan
    His son Jonathan

  9. How many did the women sing that Saul had slain?

  10. Ten thousands
    One thousand
    Thousands

  11. Who did Jonathan bring to Saul?

  12. The Philistine
    David
    His wife

  13. What did the unclean spirits cry out when they beheld Jesus?

  14. "You are the Messiah"
    "You are the Son of Man"
    “You are the Son of God.”

  15. Where did Jonathan ask David to stay?

  16. In his room
    In a secret palace
    In Saul's palace

  17. What did Jesus ask his disciples ready for him?

  18. A boat
    Some food
    A place to sleep

  19. What is the message of the Gospel of today?

  20. We must have a personal relationship with Jesus
    Jesus must be revealed through our actions
    Jesus loves unconditionally

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Tuesday, 21 January 2020

January 22, 2020 - YouTube Reflections


Often in our lives there is a dichotomy between what we say and what we do. Our actions do not always match our words. There are also times when we say one thing and do another. The call of the text of today is to be as consistent as we possibly can. One way of doing this is to avoid judging others too easily. Another way would be to avoid promising what we know we will not be able to deliver and to think carefully before we speak and commit.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020 - Is there a synchrony between your words and your actions?


To read the texts click on the texts:1 Sam 17:32-33,37,40-51; Mk 3:1-6
The Gospel text of today concerns a Sabbath controversy. Though Mark does not specify at the beginning of this episode who it was that was watching Jesus for a reason to accuse him, at the end of the episode they are named as Pharisees and Herodians. While Pharisees had no political authority at the time of Jesus, they were influential. Herodians were a group of wealthy people who were partisans of Herod Antipas.

It is important to note that Jesus does nothing to break the Sabbath rest, but his question is the reason for the hostility. The response to Jesus' question is silence which here may be interpreted as an indication of the hostility of his opponents and of their intention to destroy him. Anyone who truly cares about the law will agree with Jesus and rejoice that a man has been made whole again. Though the man in this case is not in any way near death, Jesus adds to the second part of his question the words "to save life or to kill?" This seems to be Mark's way of anticipating the intentions of Jesus' opponents. The point he seems to be making is that they object to someone being made whole on the Sabbath because they are concerned about the law, yet on the same Sabbath, they will not hesitate to plot the destruction of someone else. The contrast between their words and their deeds is strongly brought out.

Often in our lives there is a dichotomy between what we say and what we do. Our actions do not always match our words. There are also times when we say one thing and do another. The call of the text of today is to be as consistent as we possibly can. One way of doing this is to avoid judging others too easily. Another way would be to avoid promising what we know we will not be able to deliver and to think carefully before we speak and commit.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020 - 1 Sam 17:32-33,37,40-51; Mk 3:1-6

Wednesday, January 22, 2020 - 1 Sam 17:32-33,37,40-51; Mk 3:1-6


  1. Where did David put the stones he had gathered?

  2. In his pocket
    In his shepherd's bag
    In front of him on the ground

  3. What did Jesus say to the man with the withered arm?

  4. Be healed
    I command you to rise
    Stretch out your hand

  5. How many tones did David choose?

  6. Seven
    Six
    Five

  7. What did the Philistines do when they saw their champion was dead?

  8. They fought even more fiercely
    They fled
    They got more armies to fight

  9. With whom did David say he would fight?

  10. The Philistine
    The enemy
    The Assyrian

  11. Where was the man with the withered arm?

  12. In the market place
    In the synagogue
    On the street

  13. Which hand on the man was withered?

  14. Right
    Left
    We are not told

  15. With whom did the Pharisees conspire against Jesus?

  16. The scribes
    The chief priests
    The Herodians

  17. Who was in front of the Philistine as he drew near David?

  18. The whole army
    His shield-bearer
    The Philistine battalion

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. Ther must be a synchrony between our words and actions
    Our actions must match our words
    We must do what we say

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Monday, 20 January 2020

Tuesday, January 22, 2020 - YouTube Reflections


It is possible that sometimes we are so focussed on following the rules that we believe God has set for us that we might lose sight of human persons whose needs we must respond to first.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020 - How often in your life have rules and regulations become more important than love? What will you do about it today?


To read the texts click on the texts: 1 Sam 16:1-13; Mk 2:23-28
Today’s text is a pronouncement story. In such a story, the saying of Jesus is of central importance. In this story, it appears at the end where after Jesus pronounces that it was the Sabbath (rules and regulations) that was made for the human person and not the other way around, he identifies The Son of Man as Lord even of the Sabbath.

The Gospel of Mark does not explicate what the Pharisees are complaining about. They surely could not be complaining that the disciples of Jesus were stealing because they were plucking ears of corn, since Deut. 23:25 permitted a person to pluck ears of grain when he/she went into a neighbour’s field. Luke 6:1 seems to indicate that the objection of the Pharisees was that the disciples of Jesus were rubbing the heads of grain they had plucked in their hands which could be considered as threshing and therefore work, which was prohibited on the Sabbath (Exod 34:21). 

As he often does in his responses, Jesus takes the objectors beyond the immediate objection to a higher level. Here, he focuses not just on the question of work on the Sabbath or the incident that is questioned, but beyond: to the Sabbath itself. The Sabbath is at the service of the human person and not the human person at the service of the Sabbath. In other words, human needs take precedence over any rules and regulations. This must be the primary focus.

There are times in our lives when we treat rules as ends in themselves. One reason why we do this is because we have an image of God as a policeman who will catch and punish us if we do not follow the rules, as we ought to. Another reason could be that we expect that God will be gracious to us and bless us if we are faithful in flowing the rules. It is possible that sometimes we are so focussed on following the rules that we believe God has set for us that we might lose sight of human persons whose needs we must respond to first.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020 - 1 Sam 16:1-13; Mk 2:23-28

Tuesday, January 21, 2020 - 1 Sam 16:1-13; Mk 2:23-28


  1. Whom did Samuel think first that the Lord had chosen?

  2. David
    Eliab
    Jesse

  3. What did David eat in the house of God?

  4. Bread
    The bread of Presence
    The bread from wheat flour

  5. Who does Jesus is Lord of the sabbath?

  6. The Son of God
    The Son of Man
    The Law of love

  7. What were Jesus' disciples doing as they passed the grain fields?

  8. Talking loudly
    Plucking heads of grain
    Drinking wine

  9. Whom did Jesse bring second before Samuel?

  10. Eliab
    Abinadab
    David

  11. Who was High Priest when David entered the house of God with his soldiers?

  12. Abiathar
    Ahimelech
    Abimelech

  13. Where did Samuel go after anointing David?

  14. Jerusalem
    Ramah
    Bethlehem

  15. To whom did the Lord send Samuel?

  16. Jesse
    Jacob
    Joseph

  17. Whom did Jesse bring after Abindab?

  18. Eliab
    David
    Shammah

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. Love must always supersede rules
    The only rule we must follow diligently is the rule of Love
    Love and then rules become means

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Sunday, 19 January 2020

Monday, January 20, 2020 - YouTube Reflections

If we can talk of a rule or regulation that Jesus gave his disciples, it would only be the rule of love. All the actions of Jesus’ disciples must be motivated by love. This means that one may or may not fast, but that one will always and every time only love.

Monday, January 20, 2020 - How often have your actions been motivated out of fear rather than love? Will you perform at least one action from love today?

To read the texts click on the texts: 1 Sam 15:16-23; Mk 2:18-22
The text of today is a controversy story, and concerns one of the three important traditions of the Jews: fasting.  The other two were alms giving and prayer. 

The question of the people compares the behaviour of Jesus’ disciples with that of John’s disciples and the Pharisees. The latter fast whereas the disciples of Jesus do not. The law required that people fast only on the Day of Atonement (Lev 16:1-34; 23:26-32; Num 29:7-11), though there were other reasons why a person might fast including as a personal expression of sorrow or repentance (1 Kgs 21:27; 2 Sam 3:35). The Pharisees were said to fast twice a week (Lk 18:12). Since the people considered Jesus as a prophet or religious teacher, they would have expected his disciples to fast as other sects did. 

In his response to the people, Jesus clarifies that with his coming the new age has dawned, which is an age of freedom. He does this first by using the analogy of the bridegroom, and states that those who fast at the wedding are seriously insulting the host or bridegroom. However, even though there is the element of celebration in the analogy of the bridegroom, there is also a sombre note, which speaks of the bridegroom being taken away, and seems to refer to the death of Jesus, which will be an appropriate time to fast. 

The unshrunk cloth and the new wine refer to this new age, whereas the old cloak and the old wine skins refer to the old age. The two are incompatible. An attempt to patch an old garment using a new or unshrunk cloth will result in a worse tear; just as to put new wine into old skins will result in a great loss. The conclusion of the saying of Jesus emphasises that the presence of Jesus brings newness and to understand him one will need to give up the old categories that one has.

If we can talk of a rule or regulation that Jesus gave his disciples, it would only be the rule of love. All the actions of Jesus’ disciples must be motivated by love. This means that one may or may not fast, but that one will always and every time only love.