Monday, 16 September 2019

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - You Tube Reflections


God doesn't intervene every time we are hurting or have problems, just as loving parents do not or cannot intervene to soften everything for their children. Sometimes we are angry with God for not giving us the answer to prayer that we desire. Sometimes we blame him for not intervening when our loved ones are sick or die. But it is not because God lacks compassion, for Jesus shows us the Father, and Jesus is full of compassion.

If God were to call you to himself now, what are the three things you would regret not having done? Will you do them today?

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - If God were to call you to himself now, what are the three things you would regret not having done? Will you do them today?

To read the texts click on the texts: 1 Tim 3:1-13; Lk 7:11-17
The miracle of the raising the widow’s son at Nain is a miracle that is found only in the Gospel of Luke. If the centurion’s servant healed in 7:1-10 was ill and at the point of death, the son of the widow in this story is already dead. 

There are many similarities between this story and that of Elijah’s raising the widow’s son in 1 Kings 17:10,17-24. Luke emphasises that the son was the widow’s “only son” (7:12). Luke also states that when Jesus saw the widow, he had compassion for her.. Jesus raises the boy quite simply with an authoritative command. The crowd responds by regarding Jesus as a prophet and by affirming that God has been favourable to his people through the deed that Jesus had just done.

The scripture offers many instances where men and women of faith ask for help, and are granted it, even though under normal experiences they might have gone on for the rest of their lives with sin or weakness or sickness or oppression. 

Does prayer change anything? Again and again the scripture teaches that it does indeed. God can and does intervene in the normal running of his universe. We see just such an instance in this passage. The young man is dead -- his life cut short by sickness perhaps, but death is a "normal" experience in our fallen world. Then Jesus sees a mother's tears, realizes that this widow -- there is no husband and other children mourning beside her -- has lost her only son, and Jesus is moved with compassion and intervenes. 

God doesn't intervene every time we are hurting or have problems, just as loving parents do not or cannot intervene to soften everything for their children. Sometimes we are angry with God for not giving us the answer to prayer that we desire. Sometimes we blame him for not intervening when our loved ones are sick or die. But it is not because God lacks compassion, for Jesus shows us the Father, and Jesus is full of compassion. We are left with the fact that Jesus indicates that the Father will do things as a result of our prayers, because of his compassion, that he will not otherwise do. Prayer can appeal to the heart of God to bring about change.

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 1 Tim 3:1-13; Lk 7:11-17

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 1 Tim 3:1-13; Lk 7:11-17


  1. Who was being carried out as soon as Jesus reached the gate of the town?

  2. A widow
    A man who had died
    A widow's husband

  3. To whom did Jesus give the man he had raised?

  4. To the crowds as a proof
    To his mother
    To his relatives

  5. What did the bearers of the bier do when Jesus touched it?

  6. They were terrified and ran away
    They stood still
    They put it on the ground

  7. How many letter did Paul write to Titus?

  8. One
    Two
    Three

  9. When the Lord saw the widow what did he have for her?

  10. Love
    Mercy
    Compassion

  11. Throughout which place did the word about Jesus spread?

  12. Jerusalem
    Galilee
    Judea

  13. To which town did Jesus go soon afterward?

  14. Bathel
    Nain
    Name

  15. Above what must the overseer or bishop be?

  16. Reproach
    All others
    Some in the community

  17. What mus the bishop or overseer not love?

  18. Himself
    Others
    Money

  19. What is the message of the Gospel of today?

  20. Faith is required for miracles to come true
    Jesus is a compassionate God
    Jesus wants us to have life to the full

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Sunday, 15 September 2019

Monday, September 16, 2019 - You Tube Reflections


There are times when after having tried all available means to solve a problem that we might be facing, we might be tempted to throw up our hands in despair and simply give up. The centurion’s faith is an inspiration to every one of us that we need to keep on keeping on despite all evidence to the contrary.

Monday, September 16, 2019 - Will you keep on keeping on today; even when things might not go the way you plan?

To read the txts click on the texts: 1 Tim 2:1-8; Lk 7:1-10
In the story of today’s Gospel, we will read of a centurion’s response of faith in Jesus. The emphasis in the miracle is given to the power of Jesus’ word. 

There is a close parallel to this story in Matthew and a more distant parallel in John. In Matthew, the servant is “lying paralysed at home”, whereas in Luke, the “slave is at the point of death”. While in Matthew, it is the centurion himself who comes to make the request of Jesus, in Luke; he sends first a delegation of elders who would have been leaders of the synagogue. They vouch for the merit of his request. As Jesus starts for the centurion’s house, a second delegation is sent. This time it is the friends of the centurion. 

The centurion’s words, “I am not worthy” contrast sharply with the tribute paid to him by the Jewish elders, who testified, “He is worthy”. The effect is to place the centurion in an even better light. The centurion’s words may also convey that he was aware that the Pharisees’ regarded a Gentile’s house as unclean and that a Jew would be defiled by entering his home. He is also confident that Jesus could heal at a distance. Just as he acts by commanding his subordinates, he expects no more than that Jesus would do the same. The point of the story is Jesus’ affirmation of the centurion’s faith and not the report of the healing that concludes the story. Luke’s description communicates Jesus’ surprise at the Gentile’s faith, and his approval as well. Where Jesus would have expected to find faith in an Israelite, here he finds it in a Gentile.

There are times when after having tried all available means to solve a problem that we might be facing, we might be tempted to throw up our hands in despair and simply give up. The centurion’s faith is an inspiration to everyone of us that we need to keep on keeping on despite all evidence to the contrary.

Monday, September 16, 2019 -1 Tim 2:1-8; Lk 7:1-10

Monday, September 16, 2019 -1 Tim 2:1-8; Lk 7:1-10


  1. How many mediators are there between God and humans?

  2. Three
    Two
    One

  3. Where did Jesus enter after he had finished all his sayings?

  4. Jerusalem
    Capernaum
    Galilee

  5. Where did Jesus say he had not found such profound faith?

  6. In Jerusalem
    In Israel
    In Nazareth

  7. Besides those in high places for who else must supplication be made?

  8. Kings
    Princes
    Queens

  9. Whose slave was close to death?

  10. A synagogue official's slave
    A Centurion's slave
    A chief priest's slave

  11. Of whom does Paul say he was appointed a teacher?

  12. Of all people
    Of Christians
    Of Gentiles

  13. What does God our Saviour desire?

  14. That some be saved
    That most be saved
    That all be saved

  15. What kind of hand must the people lift up when praying?

  16. Washed hands
    Unsoiled hands
    Holy hands

  17. Who were sent to Jesus to ask him to heal the slave?

  18. Soldiers
    Jewish elders
    The Townspeople

  19. What is the message of the Gospel of today?

  20. Faith means to believe before we see
    Faith is to believe even when we cannot see
    Faith must be shown in action

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Saturday, 14 September 2019

Sunday, September 15, 2019 - You Tube Reflections


The Parable in the Gospel text of today is popularly known as “The Prodigal Son.” However, a more apt title is “The Prodigal Father.” This is because the son is prodigal only with material things. It is the father who is the real prodigal in the story. It is the father who is lavish. It is the father who is wasteful. It is the father who is a spendthrift, but with his love. The prodigality of the father’s love shines through the whole story.

Sunday, September 15, 2019 - The Prodigal Father


To read the texts click on the texts: Ex 32:7-11,13-14; 1Tim 1:12-17; Lk 15:1-32
The Parable in the Gospel text of today is popularly known as “The Prodigal Son.” However, a more apt title is “The Prodigal Father.” This is because the son is prodigal only with material things. It is the father who is the real prodigal in the story. It is the father who is lavish. It is the father who is wasteful. It is the father who is a spendthrift, but with his love. The prodigality of the father’s love shines through the whole story.

Demanding his share of the property while his father was still alive would mean that the younger son regarded his father as dead. The younger son’s selfishness and self-centeredness led him to concentrate only on his own wants. The needs of the other did not matter. Despite this offensive and rude demand, the father gives the younger son what he demands. The father will be selfless. He will hold nothing back. For the father, the son’s wants are greater than his own needs. The selfishness of the son reaches its depths when he spends all that he receives from his father for his own pleasure and enjoyment.

This is the selfishness shown by the people in the first reading of today when they make “gods” of things. They are so caught up in their own desire for pleasure and gratification that they will stoop down to making things ends in themselves. They forget that the one end is God. However, like the father in the Gospel text, God shows that, despite the people’s selfishness, God will be selfless. Despite their abandoning God, God will not abandon them. Though by right, and in justice, God ought to have let God’s wrath burn against the people, God relented and, after listening to Moses, did not bring on them the destruction that was intended. God’s love exceeds mercy and this love is shown in giving people a chance to change, a chance to repent. The repentance that the people are called to is shown by the younger son in action. When he is in dire straits and at the lowest depth of his life, he comes to his senses. He realizes that he can go back. He realizes that there is mercy. He realizes that his father’s love will take him back. However, the reality of the father’s welcome goes beyond the younger son’s expectations. He is not even allowed to finish the act of contrition that he had prepared. He is not allowed to finish speaking his words of remorse and regret. His father does not need words. His father does not need to know how many sins his son has committed. His father does not ask for an account of the money that he squandered, nor does he impute guilt to his son. It is enough for the father that his son has come home. It is enough that his son who had gone away has returned. It is enough that the son, who was lost and dead, is now found and alive.

The Apostle Paul experienced this mercy and love and he speaks about this in the second reading of today. God did not count his sins against him. God did not hold his wrong doings in front of his face. God forgave his blasphemy. God showed him mercy. This mercy is intrinsic to God and is borne out by the name that the Son of God bears: Jesus. It is the name which means God saves from sin. It is a name which means that, no matter how far away we might go, no matter how many graces we squander, no matter how many sins we commit, God, in Jesus, will ever love and forgive.

If this is so evident why do so many people find it difficult to believe that God is good and loving, that God is forgiving and merciful, and that God’s mercy always outweighs human sinfulness? The answer to this is found in the second part of the Parable of the Gospel text and in the attitude of the elder son. For him, like for many of us, the relationship with his father is one of quid pro quo or barter exchange, rather than love. He is good only because he hopes to receive reward. He does not address his father as “Father”, nor does he refer to his brother as “brother”. He distances himself from both his father and his brother and attaches himself to his own merit and fidelity. He argues his case on the grounds of what he thinks he rightfully deserves. Even as he does this, he points to the failings of the younger son.

The elder son represents all of us who think we can make it on our own, all of us who might be proud of the kind of lives we live. He represents all of us who have an image of God as one who must reward us for the good that we do and a God whom we dare not displease because we might be punished. However, even to persons such as these, God continues to reach out in love. God continues to plead with such persons to realize that their good actions must not stem from a desire for reward or from a fear of punishment. Good actions must be the consequence of having received God’s unconditional mercy and love. They must be the result of having been loved. All persons must love and forgive unconditionally because that is the way God loves and forgives them.

Sunday, September 15, 2019 - Ex 32:7-11,13-14; 1Tim 1:12-17; Lk 15:1-32

Sunday, September 15, 2019 - Ex 32:7-11,13-14; 1Tim 1:12-17; Lk 15:1-32


  1. Whom does Paul say Christ came to save?

  2. The righteous
    Sinners
    The truthful

  3. Which son asked for the share of his property?

  4. The elder son
    The younger son
    Both sons

  5. Besides tax collectors who were drawing near to listen to Jesus?

  6. The Scribes
    Sinners
    The Sadducees

  7. How does the Lord say the people have acted?

  8. Perversely
    Rightly
    According to his will

  9. What does Paul say he received from the Lord because he had acted ignorantly?

  10. Grace
    Peace
    Mercy

  11. How many coins did the woman have?

  12. One
    Ten
    One hundred

  13. What image did the people worship?

  14. A Bull
    A Ram
    A Calf

  15. What metal were the coins that the woman had made of?

  16. Silver
    Gold
    Bronze

  17. How many sons did the man in the parable have?

  18. Three
    Two
    One

  19. What is the message of the Gospel of today?

  20. God in Jesus is unconditional love
    God loves without distinction
    God loves all equally

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Friday, 13 September 2019

Saturday, September 14, 2019 - The Exaltation of the Cross - You Tube Reflections


The cross is at the centre of our lives every time we face sickness and death. The cross is at the centre of our lives in frailty and old age. The cross is at the centre of our lives every time we feel utterly alone and abandoned. 

The Cross is at the centre of our lives every time we are tempted to give in and give up. Only when we embrace the cross is it possible for God to raise us up and give us new life.

Saturday, September 14, 2019 - The Exaltation of the Cross - Lifted up and Exalted


To read the texts click on the texts: Num21:4-9;Phil 2:6-11; Jn 3:13-17

The Exaltation of the Cross is one of the twelve great feasts in the yearly Church cycle. Because the cross is at the heart and centre of all that we as Christians believe, the Church celebrates the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, the triumph of the cross of Christ over the power of sin and death. And so this feast provides us with another opportunity to reflect on the central mystery of our faith: that the one who was lifted up on the cross in crucifixion has triumphed over the power of sin and death because God highly exalted him.

This feast commemorates two historical events: first, the finding of what was considered the Cross of Christ in the year 326 by the mother of Constantine the Great, St Helen, and second its recovery from Persia in 628.

A story is told of Emperor Heraclius who in the year 628 after making peace with the Persians carried what was considered the Cross on which Jesus hung back to Jerusalem on his shoulders. He was clothed with costly garments and with ornaments of precious stones. But at the entrance to Mt. Calvary a strange incident occurred. Try as hard as he would, he could not go forward. Zacharias, the Bishop of Jerusalem, then said to the astonished monarch: "Consider, O Emperor, that with these triumphal ornaments you are far from resembling Jesus carrying His Cross." The Emperor then put on a penitential garb and continued the journey and carried the Cross into the Church of Holy Wisdom where it was triumphantly exalted. It was then resolved that the Fest of the Triumph or Exaltation of the Cross be celebrated by the Church in all parts of the world.

The Cross -- because of what it represents -- is the most potent and universal symbol of the Christian faith. It is a constant reminder -- and witness -- of Christ's ultimate triumph, His victory over sin and death through His suffering and dying on the Cross. The cross, once a tool of death, has become a means to life, an instrument of our salvation; it gives strength to resist temptation, it gives hope to seek new life and it dispels fear and darkness.

As Christians, we exalt the Cross of Christ as the instrument of our salvation. Adoration of the Cross is, thus, adoration of Jesus Christ, the Son of God who became Man, who suffered and died on the Cross for our redemption from sin and death. The cross represents the One Sacrifice by which Jesus, obedient even unto death, accomplished our salvation. The cross is a symbolic summary of the Passion, Crucifixion, Death and Resurrection of Christ.

In the first reading of today we read of how Moses lifted up the bronze serpent in order to heal and bring wholeness to a broken people. This was God’s way of showing the people that He was primarily a God who wanted to save and redeem and not condemn and destroy. The Church and especially the evangelist John interpreted this lifting of the bronze serpent by Moses as a foreshadowing of the salvation through Jesus when He was lifted up on the Cross. The Triumph of the Cross is the Triumph of Jesus Christ whose love for us and obedience to his Father climaxed with his death on the cross. The deeper meaning of the Cross is presented in The Christological hymn in today's second reading from the Letter of Paul to the Philippians. Jesus emptied himself completely, not just becoming a human being but accepting the worst public death of the society he lived in to demonstrate the extent of the love of God for us. He died making a willing statement of love, filling the world with the love he had for his Father and his Father had for him. We are saved from the horrors of evil, from meaningless lives due to the love of the Lord. Because Jesus died on a cross for us we are able to proclaim to the world: Jesus is Lord. His love made this possible. When we venerate and adore the cross we are saying: Jesus is Lord of our lives.

To the world this act of surrender on the cross was an act of utter humiliation and subjugation and the height of folly. To the world this death on the cross was a wasted life. To the world this death on the cross was a sign of utter defeat. But what the world calls wisdom, God calls foolishness, and what the world calls strength God call weakness. Therefore God highly exalted the crucified one by raising him from the dead. God gave Jesus his own name so that every creature on earth must now call Jesus “Lord.” What human beings did, God contradicted. And so in the weakness and foolishness of the cross we see the wisdom and power of God: Christ crucified. In him and his cross, surrender becomes power, waste becomes gain and death and defeat become victory and new life.

The cross is at the centre of our lives every time we face sickness and death. The cross is at the centre of our lives in frailty and old age. The cross is at the centre of our lives every time we feel utterly alone and abandoned. The Cross is at the centre of our lives every time we are tempted to give in and give up. It is at the centre of our lives every time we are tempted to throw our hands up in despair. It keeps reminding us that only when we embrace the cross in the midst of suffering and abandonment can we understand the power of the resurrection. Only when we have the courage to keep on keeping on can we like Christ become victorious and conquer. Only when we embrace the cross is it possible for God to raise us up and give us new life.

Saturday, September 14, 2019 - Num 21:4-9;Phil 2:6-11; Jn 3:13-17

Saturday, September 14, 2019 - Num 21:4-9;Phil 2:6-11; Jn 3:13-17


  1. Till what point did Jesus become obedient?

  2. To the point of his patience
    To the point of death
    To the point of his own will

  3. Why did God send his son into the world?

  4. To condemn the world
    To punish the world
    To save the world

  5. Who does Jesus say has ascended into heaven?

  6. No one
    The Son of Man
    The Son of God

  7. What did the Lord send as punishment in response to the grumbling of the people?

  8. Poisonous serpents
    Wild lions
    A famine

  9. What form did Jesus take?

  10. King
    Lord
    Slave

  11. From which mountain did the Israelites set out?

  12. Mount Tabor
    Mount Hor
    Mount Sinai

  13. Who lifted the bronze serpent in the wilderness?

  14. Jesus
    Joshua
    Moses

  15. How many chapters does the book of Numbers contain?

  16. Thirty-six
    Thirty-seven
    Thirty-nine

  17. From where had Moses brought the people out?

  18. Israel
    Egypt
    Babylon

  19. What is the message of the Gospel of today?

  20. In the Cross is salvation
    The Cross is foolishness to many but wisdom to a disciple of Jesus
    Jesus dared to die that we might live

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Thursday, 12 September 2019

Friday, September 13, 2019 - You Tube Reflections


Before one can point to the faults of others, introspection is called for. One must realise that often one might be guilty of greater misdeeds than the person to whom one is pointing.

Did you know that when you point a finger at someone, there are three fingers pointing back at you?

Friday, September 13, 2019 - Did you know that when you point a finger at someone, there are three fingers pointing back at you?


To read the texts click on the texts: 1 Tim 1:1-2,12-14; Lk 6:39-42
The parable that begins this section is a rhetorical question. The blind who need someone else to lead them surely cannot lead another who is blind. What is worse is that if this is attempted both persons will be in trouble. This is why disciples who intend to lead others must first learn to be like the master. If they attempt to lead others without first learning from the master, their teaching will be erroneous.

The second parable reinforces the point made in 6:37-38 about not judging or condemning. Before one can point to the faults of others, introspection is called for. One must realise that often one might be guilty of greater misdeeds than the person to whom one is pointing.

Friday, September 13, 2019 - 1 Tim 1:1-2,12-14; Lk 6:39-42

Friday, September 13, 2019 - 1 Tim 1:1-2,12-14; Lk 6:39-42


  1. What does Paul say he was formerly?

  2. A sinner
    A saint
    A blasphemer

  3. Who is a disciple not above?

  4. The slave
    The teacher
    The Lord

  5. What do we notice in the neighbour's eye?

  6. Dust
    A speck
    A log

  7. What did Paul receive because he acted ignorantly?

  8. A punishment
    Mercy
    Forty lashes

  9. What do we not notice in our own eye?

  10. A speck
    A log
    Dust particles

  11. To whom does Paul address this letter?

  12. Titus
    Timothy
    Apollos

  13. How many letter did Paul write to Timothy?

  14. One
    Two
    Three

  15. Who does Paul say he is an apostle of?

  16. God the Father
    Christ Jesus
    The Holy Spirit

  17. To what does Paul say the Lord appointed him?

  18. To be the first
    To his service
    To rule over others

  19. What is the message of the readings of today?

  20. When we point a finger at others we must know that we are not very different
    We must think before making allegations
    We must avoid judging and if we do interpret positively

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Wednesday, 11 September 2019

Thursday, September 12, 2019 - You Tube reflections


The call today is to be actors and not reactors. We must respond not retaliate or react.

Thursday, September 12, 2019 - How often have you done something for someone else without any expectation whatever? Will you do something like this today?

To read the texts read the texts: Col 3:12-17; Lk 6:27-38
After pronouncing the beatitudes and woes, the Lucan Jesus goes on to speak of love of enemies. The disciples are called to be actors rather than reactors. They are to love their enemies and bless and pray for those who are against them. How this is to be done practically is then illustrated. Disciples are to offer no resistance to the violent and are to be generous in their giving expecting nothing in return. 

The Golden rule is stated positively here and by placing it in this context, Luke probably intends that this is how the disciples must respond to those who are against them. 

Our relationships generally are based on barter exchange. If someone does good to me then I will be good to that person in turn. However, the Lucan Jesus calls his disciples to go beyond and to build relationships based on unconditional love. 

The last two verses of this section deal with not judging and not condemning. These are followed by two positive prescriptions to forgive and give freely without measure.

Thursday, September 12, 2019 - Col 3:12-17; Lk 6:27-38

Thursday, September 12, 2019 - Col 3:12-17; Lk 6:27-38


  1. Whom does Jesus ask his disciples to love?

  2. Their friends
    Their family
    Their enemies

  3. For whom must the disciples pray?

  4. For their loved ones
    For those who abuse them
    For those who need prayers

  5. If they have a complaint what must the Colossians do?

  6. They must take their opponent to court
    They must forgive
    They must prosecute their enemies

  7. Whom does Jesus ask his disciples to bless?

  8. Those who are evil
    Those who curse them
    Those who are sinners

  9. Like whom must the disciples be merciful?

  10. Like Jesus
    Their father
    The Holy Spirit

  11. What must rule in the hearts of the Colossians

  12. Christ the Lord
    The peace of Christ
    God the Father

  13. In whose name must the Colossians do what they do?

  14. In the name of the Lord Jesus
    In the name of the most high God
    In the name of the Father

  15. What does Paul say binds everything in perfect harmony

  16. Grace
    Peace
    Love

  17. To whom must the disciples do good?

  18. To those who love them
    To those who hate them
    To those from whom they expect good

  19. What is the message of the Gospel of today?

  20. We must act without expectation
    When we act, we must act freely
    Our reward must be in the doing of the action

Thanks for taking the Quiz. I hope it makes the word of God more relevant. Let me know on errolsj@gmail.com. Suggestions are always welcome.

Tuesday, 10 September 2019

Wednesday, September 10, 2019 - You Tube Reflections


When we look at the injustice, disharmony and poverty around us it is not easy to believe that our God is a God who cares for the poor. Yes, this God became poor in history to show us the way and how we are to live. If we can be a little less selfish, work in our own situations toward harmony and give a little something to someone else, we will be bringing God and his word to them.

Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - When did you last say a positive word to someone? Will you speak a positive word to at least one person today?

To read the texts click on the texts: Col 3:1-11; Lk 6:20-26
The Sermon on the Plain in the Gospel of Luke is packed into one chapter of 30 verses unlike that of Matthew’s Sermon on the Mount, which extends over three chapters totalling 109 verses.

Unlike in Matthew’s, “Sermon on the Mount” (Mt 5:1 – 7:29) where Jesus pronounces only Beatitudes (Mt 5:3-12), in Luke’s, “Sermon on the Plain”, for each of the four beatitudes there is a corresponding woe. Also unlike Matthew, Luke speaks in the second person and not the third person, which has the effect of making the pronouncements more direct, more personal.

The first beatitude is addressed to the poor (not “the poor in spirit” Mt 5:3). This is indeed a scandalous statement because it overturns all conventional expectations and pronounces a blessing on those who are marginalized. They are promised the kingdom of God by being released from their marginalisation and oppression. It brings to light that God is making an option for the poor. The next two beatitudes concern hunger and mourning and could be addressed to the same group. The poor because they are poor are also hungry and weep. They are promised an end of their hunger in the promise that they will be filled and an end to their weeping and mourning in the promise that they will laugh. The fourth and final beatitude in Luke speaks about the disciple who will be hated, excluded, reviled and defamed. These are called to rejoice in their being reviled and promised a reward in heaven. They are also given as consolation the example of those who went through similar trails before them.

Corresponding to each beatitude, Luke has a woe. The first woe is addressed to the rich who have received their consolation already and so can expect nothing more. Those who have had their fill now and told that they will go hungry and those who laugh now will weep. Those of whom people speak well are compared to the false prophets.

When we look at the injustice, disharmony and poverty around us it is not easy to believe that our God is a God who cares for the poor. Yes, this God became poor in history to show us the way and how we are to live. If we can be a little less selfish, work in our own situations toward harmony and give a little something to someone else, we will be bringing God and his word to them.